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Dating a cougar ii

It certainly wasn't in a quest for immortal fame since poets in his era had probably no such notions for themselves.However, some scholars suspect the presence of large-scale changes in the text and attribute this to oral transmission.

dating a cougar ii-51dating a cougar ii-87

In spite of Hesiod's complaints about poverty, life on his father's farm could not have been too uncomfortable if Works and Days is anything to judge by, since he describes the routines of prosperous yeomanry rather than peasants.This tradition follows a familiar ironic convention: the oracle that predicts accurately after all.The other tradition, first mentioned in an epigram by Chersias of Orchomenus written in the 7th century BC (within a century or so of Hesiod's death) claims that Hesiod lies buried at Orchomenus, a town in Boeotia.The dating of Hesiod's life is a contested issue in scholarly circles (see § Dating below).Epic narrative allowed poets like Homer no opportunity for personal revelations.His basic language was the main literary dialect of the time, Homer's Ionian.

It is probable that Hesiod wrote his poems down, or dictated them, rather than passed them on orally, as rhapsodes did—otherwise the pronounced personality that now emerges from the poems would surely have been diluted through oral transmission from one rhapsode to another.

Thereafter, Greek writers began to consider Homer earlier than Hesiod.

Devotees of Orpheus and Musaeus were probably responsible for precedence being given to their two cult heroes and maybe the Homeridae were responsible in later antiquity for promoting Homer at Hesiod's expense.

The personality behind the poems is unsuited to the kind of "aristocratic withdrawal" typical of a rhapsode but is instead "argumentative, suspicious, ironically humorous, frugal, fond of proverbs, wary of women." He resembles Solon in his preoccupation with issues of good versus evil and "how a just and all-powerful god can allow the unjust to flourish in this life".

He recalls Aristophanes in his rejection of the idealised hero of epic literature in favour of an idealised view of the farmer.

Two different—yet early—traditions record the site of Hesiod's grave.